Drug and Alcohol Policy

DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY/ DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITIES ACT


Goodwin College is dedicated to providing quality educational services to its students and a quality work environment for its employees. In keeping with this commitment, Goodwin College maintains a campus free from drug and alcohol abuse. Any violation of this policy will warrant disciplinary actions up to and including dismissal or termination and may result in local, state, and/or federal criminal charges.

The Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989 (Public Law 101-226) requires that all institutions of higher education implement a program that prevents the use of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees. Goodwin College’s abuse prevention policy is as follows:

1. Standards of Conduct
All students and employees are prohibited from the unlawful possession, manufacture, use, or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol on Goodwin College’s campus and parking lots, or as part of any of the school’s activities, including field trips and any other off-campus activities sponsored by Goodwin College. Students and employees are also prohibited from being under the influence of illegal drugs or alcohol while on Goodwin College’s campus, parking lots, or as part of any school-sponsored activities.

For information regarding the college's drug testing policy and procedure for employees please see the Human Resources Department.

Statement on Medical Marijuana
Goodwin College receives federal funding through Title IV. As a condition of accepting this money, Goodwin is required to certify that it complies with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act. The federal government regulates drugs through the Controlled Substances Act, which does not recognize the difference between medical and recreational use of marijuana. Thus, to comply with the Federal Drug Free School and Communities Act and avoid losing federal funding, Goodwin College prohibits all marijuana use, including medical marijuana, and students and employees may be sanctioned for its use. Therefore, marijuana prescribed for medical purposes is prohibited at Goodwin College even though Connecticut’s state law permits its use.


2. Legal Sanctions
Students and employees are subject to disciplinary sanctions under Goodwin College’s policies on drug and alcohol use, and subject to criminal penalties under both state and federal law.

All drugs are controlled by Federal Law. (Most drug offenses are prosecuted under state law, which may be more severe.)

I. FEDERAL LAWS

A. DRUGS

FEDERAL PENALTIES AND SANCTIONS FOR ILLEGAL POSSESSION OF A CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE

1. Penalty for Simple Possession (see 21 U.S.C. 844[A])

• FIRST CONVICTION: Up to one year imprisonment and fined at least $1,000 but not more than $100,000 or both.

• AFTER 1 PRIOR DRUG CONVICTION: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed two years, and fined at least $2,500 but not more than $250,000 or both.

• AFTER 2 OR MORE PRIOR DRUG CONVICTIONS: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed three years and fined at least $5,000 but not more than $250,000 or both.

• SPECIAL SENTENCING PROVISIONS FOR POSSESSION OF CRACK COCAINE: Mandatory at least five years in prison, not to exceed 20 years and fined up to $250,000 or both, if:

a. First conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds five grams;

b. Second crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds three grams;

c. Third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds one gram.

2. Criminal Forfeitures (see 21 U.S.C. 853[a][2] and 881[a][7])

Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or to facilitate possession of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than one-year imprisonment. (See special sentencing provisions regarding crack.)

3. Forfeitures (see 21 U.S.C. 881[a][4]) Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft, or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled substance.

4. Civil Penalties for Possession of Small Amounts of Certain Controlled Substances (see 21 U.S.C. 844a) Civil fine up to $10,000 (pending adoption of final regulations).

5. Denial of Federal Benefits to Drug Traffickers and Possessors (see 21 U.S.C. 853a) Denial of federal benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts, and professional and commercial licenses up to one year for first offense, up to five years for second and subsequent offenses.

6. Firearm Forfeiture (see 18 U.S.C. 922[g]) Ineligible to receive or purchase a firearm.

7. Miscellaneous Revocation of Certain Federal Licenses and Benefits, e.g., pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., are vested within the authorities of individual federal agencies.

8. Federal Trafficking Penalties

Please visit dea.gov for additional information.

II. STATE LAWS

A. DRUGS

1. Penalties for Illegal Manufacture, Distribution, Sale, Prescription, or Dispensing of Controlled Substances

a. Hallucinogenic or narcotic substances other than marijuana. First offense: Prison sentence not to exceed 15 years and/or

fine not to exceed $50,000. Second offense: Prison sentence not to exceed 30 years and/or fine not to exceed $100,000.

Each subsequent offense: Prison sentence not to exceed 30 years and/or fine not to exceed $250,000 (see Connecticut General Statutes 21–277).

b. Other controlled substances excluding marijuana. First offense: Prison sentence not to exceed seven (7) years and/or fine not to exceed $25,000. Each subsequent offense: Prison sentence not to exceed 15 years and/or fine not to exceed $100,000 (see Connecticut General Statutes 21–277).

c. Examples of such substances include, but are not limited to, mescaline, peyote, morphine, LSD, cocaine (including “crack”), opium, amphetamines, and heroin. For a complete definition of controlled, hallucinogenic, and narcotic substances, see Connecticut General Statutes 21a–240.

2. Penalties for Illegal Manufacture, Distribution, Sale, Prescription or Administration by Nondrug-Dependent Person

a. Minimum prison term of not less than five years and maximum term of life imprisonment for the manufacture, distribution, sale, or possession or transportation with the intent to sell of one ounce or more of heroin, methadone, or cocaine (including “crack”), or one-half gram more of cocaine in a freebase form, or five milligrams or more of LSD (see Connecticut General Statutes 21a–278).

b. Minimum prison term of not less than five years for first offense, and for subsequent offenses, minimum prison term of not less than 10 years, for the manufacture, distribution, sale, or transportation or possession with the intent to sell any narcotic, hallucinogenic or amphetamine-type substance, or one kilogram or more of a cannabis-type substance (which includes marijuana) (see Connecticut General Statutes 21a-278).

3. Penalties for Illegal Manufacture, Distribution, Sale, Prescription, or Administration Involving Minors (see Connecticut General Statutes 21a–278a)

a. Mandatory two-year prison term for the distribution, sale, dispensing, offering, or giving of any controlled substance to another person who is under 18 years of age and who is at least two years younger than the person violating the statute.

b. Mandatory three-year prison term for the manufacture, distribution, dispensing, sale, transportation or possession with intent to sell, offering or gift of any controlled substance on or within fifteen hundred feet of the real property comprising a public or private elementary school.

4. Penalties for Possession (see Connecticut General Statutes 21a–279)

a. Any person who possesses or has under his control any quantity of any narcotic substance, including marijuana, for a first offense may be imprisoned not more than seven years and/or fined not more than $50,000, and for a second offense, may be imprisoned not more than 15 years and/or fined not more than $100,000.

b. Any person who possesses or has under his control any quantity of a hallucinogenic substance other than marijuana or four ounces or more of a cannabis-type substance for a first offense, may be imprisoned not more than five years or be fined not more than two thousand dollars or be both fined and imprisoned, and for a subsequent offense may be imprisoned not more than ten years or be fined not more than five thousand dollars or be both fined and imprisoned.

c. Any person who possesses or has under his control any quantity of any controlled substance other than a narcotic substance, or a hallucinogenic substance other than marijuana or who possesses or has under his control one-half ounce or more but less than four ounces of a cannabis-type substance, for a first offense, may be fined not more than one thousand dollars or be imprisoned not more than one year, or be both fined and imprisoned; and for a subsequent offense, may be fined not more than three thousand dollars or be imprisoned not more than five years, or be both fined and imprisoned.

d. A variety of sentences are available under this statute depending on the substance possessed, its quantity, and the background of the offender.

B. ALCOHOL

1. Sale of Alcohol to Minors and Intoxicated Persons (see Connecticut General Statutes 30–86)

a. Any permittee who sells or delivers alcoholic liquor to any minor, or to any intoxicated person, or to any habitual drunkard shall be fined not more than $1,000 and/or imprisoned not more than one (1) year.

b. Any person who delivers or gives alcoholic liquor to any minor, except on the order of a practicing physician, shall be fined not more than $1,500 and/or imprisoned not more than 18 months.

2. Inducing Minors to Procure Liquor (see Connecticut General Statutes 30–87)

a. Any person who induces any minor to procure alcoholic liquor from any person permitted to sell the same shall be fined not more than $1,000 and/or imprisoned not more than one year.

3. Misrepresentation of Age (see Connecticut General Statutes 30–88a)

a. Any person who misrepresents his age or uses or exhibits for the purpose of procuring alcoholic liquor an operator’s license belonging to any other person shall be fined not less than $200 nor more than $500 and/or imprisoned for not more than 30 days.

4. Procuring Liquor by Persons Forbidden and Public Possession of Liquor by Minors (see Connecticut General Statutes 30-89)

a. Any person to whom the sale of alcoholic liquor is by law forbidden who purchases or attempts to purchase such liquor or who makes any false statement for the purpose of procuring such liquor shall be fined not less than $200 nor more than $500.

b. Any minor who possesses any alcoholic liquor on any street or highway or in any public place or place open to the public, including a club that is open to the public, shall be fined not less than $200 nor more than $500.

5. Dram Shop Act (see Connecticut General Statutes 30–102)

a. If any person, by himself or his agent, sells any alcoholic liquor to any intoxicated person, and such purchaser, in consequence of such intoxication, thereafter injures the person or property of another, such seller shall pay just damages to the person injured, up to the amount of $20,000, or to persons injured in consequence of such intoxication up to an aggregate amount of $50,000.

6. Operating a Motor Vehicle While Under the Influence of Liquor or Drug or While Impaired by Liquor (see Connecticut General Statutes 14–227a)

a. Any person who operates a motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drug or both or who operates a motor vehicle while his ability to operate is impaired by the consumption of intoxicating liquor shall, for conviction of a first violation, be fined not less than $500 and be imprisoned for not more than six months, and shall have his operator’s license suspended for one year.

b. This statute provides for greater penalties for subsequent offenses.


III. LOCAL LAWS

A. ALCOHOL

1. Possession and Consumption of Alcoholic Liquor In, Within and Upon Public Areas, Public Highways, and Parking Areas (see Town of East Hartford Code of Ordinances Sec. 13-6.)

a. No person shall consume any alcoholic liquor, or have in his possession any open container of alcoholic liquor, while upon or within the limits of any public highway, public area or parking area within the Town of East Hartford. The possession of an open container of alcoholic liquor or consumption therefrom by any person while in a motor vehicle parked within or upon parking areas of a public highway or sidewalk, or within or upon a public area, shall also be a violation hereof.

b. Any person violating this ordinance will receive a written warning for first offenses and then a pay fine for future offenses. Pay fines are $99 for any violation of Town Ordinances.


Any questions concerning the legal sanctions under state law for unlawful use or distribution of illegal drugs or alcohol should be directed to the State’s Attorney’s Office, 80 Washington Street, Hartford, CT 06106, 860-566-3190. Any questions concerning the legal sanctions under federal law for unlawful use or distribution of illegal drugs or alcohol should be directed to U.S. Attorney’s Office, 450 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06103, 860-947-1101.

 

3. Health Risks

Description of Health Risks

Serious health and personal risks are associated with the use of illegal drugs and abuse of alcohol. They may include temporary or permanent physical or mental impairment, injury, or death. Use and abuse of such substances may also give rise to conduct which causes injury, death, or damage to the user/abuser or to the person or property of others, resulting in criminal or civil prosecution and liability. Use and abuse of such sub­stances may also lead to unsafe and/or nonconsensual sex, unwanted pregnancy, and may cause defects, injury, or death in unborn children. Consequences also include temporary or permanent loss of educational or employment opportunities.

Drugs and the Body

Narcotics (Heroin):

  • Initial euphoria followed by drowsiness and nausea
  • Constricted pupils, watery eyes, dazed look
  • Overdose may produce slow, shallow breathing, clammy skin, loss of appetite and weight, and possible death

Depressants (Barbiturates, Tranquilizers):

  • Relaxed muscles, calmness, drowsiness
  • Confusion, disorientation, slurred speech
  • Overdose may produce shallow breathing, clammy skin, weak and rapid pulse, coma, and possible death

Stimulants (Cocaine, Methamphetamine):

  • Increased heart and respiratory rate, elevated blood pressure, decreased appetite
  • Blurred vision, dizziness, insomnia, anxiety
  • High doses can cause physical collapse, irregular heartbeat, stroke, and possible death

Hallucinogens (LSD, PCP, Mushrooms):

  • Illusions and hallucinations
  • Confusion, panic, anxiety, depression, and poor perception of time and distance
  • Respiratory failure, death due to careless behavior

Cannabis (Marijuana, Hashish):

  • Increased heart rate, bloodshot eyes, dry mouth and throat, and increased appetite
  • Interferes with memory, speech, coordination, and perception of time
  • Increases risk of lung cancer, weakened immune system, and affects reproductive system

Alcohol and the Body

  • Impairment of brain function, judgment, alertness, coordination, and reflexes
  • Attitude and/or behavioral changes, such as uncharacteristic hostility, or increased risk taking, such as driving recklessly
  • Alcohol taken with other drugs can intensify the effects of the drug, alter the desired effect of the drug, cause nausea, sweating, severe headaches, and convulsions
  • Addiction or chemical dependency
  • Memory blackouts
  • Uncharacteristic family, school, work, or legal problems
  • Health problems such as cirrhosis of the liver
  • If used during pregnancy, birth defects and mental retardation in users’ unborn children may occur


Materials further describing the health risks associated with the use of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol are available in the campus Counseling Office.


4. Drug and Alcohol Programs

Students seeking drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation should speak to the on-campus Therapist for confidential services. Goodwin College’s Therapist is Stephanie Frascadore, Room 221, One Riverside Drive, East Hartford, CT 06118, 860-913-2072. Hours vary but are generally between 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Appointment times can be arranged to meet the needs of students with advanced notice.

Employees seeking drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation should speak to the Human Resources Department, where they will be connected to confidential services through the Employee Assistance Program (EAP). For further information, contact Terry Antoine, Assistant Director for Human Resources, Room 144-G, One Riverside Drive, East Hartford, CT 06118, 860-727-6938.

Each state has a single agency for the various drug abuse prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation programs. In Connecticut, this is the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, 410 Capitol Avenue, PO Box 341431, Hartford, CT 06134, 860-418-7000. 

For additional treatment resources in Connecticut please see the following: https://www.treatment-centers.net/directory/connecticut.html

Awareness and prevention education related to drug and alcohol abuse occurs throughout the year as provided by the Student Services Department and the Counseling Office.


5. Disciplinary Sanctions for Violation of the Standards of Conduct

Students found to have violated the Drug and Alcohol Policy Standards of Conduct are subject to disciplinary sanctions. These include being warned, put on probation, suspended, or dismissed at the discretion of the General Conduct Board. Students are reminded that felony convictions may lead to a loss of eligibility to be hired in their chosen field.

Employees found to have violated the Drug and Alcohol Policy Standards of Conduct are subject to disciplinary sanctions. These include being subject to a disciplinary letter, suspension from work, and/or enrollment in a rehabilitation program, or termination of employment.

If a student is convicted locally or within the state for the use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of illegal drugs or alcohol, he/she will be terminated from Goodwin College and will be held liable for his/her financial obligations to the school.

If an employee is found guilty by a local or state enforcement agency, employment will be terminated until such time the employee has completed the penalties and has indicated his/her commitment to be rehabilitated.


6. Policy Review

Goodwin College will conduct a biennial review the Drug and Alcohol Policy to assess its effectiveness and ensure that disciplinary sanctions are consistently enforced. Changes in the policy will be implemented as needed following each review.